William W. Wilbur is infamous for having been an auctioneer who owned and operated a mercantile during the pre-Civil War era of Charleston, South Carolina. Wilbur’s business activities were quite varied, and included auctions, retail, brokering, notary, and most notoriously, being an active agent in the slave trade.

N.C. Folger's Clothing Store

Of the many token varieties listed in Wright, Miller, and Rulau, few are as difficult to attribute than the merchant token emissions of Nathan C. Folger. Collectors will find that this is not because the emissions consist of a vast number of obscure differences, but rather because the aforementioned authors did an incredibly confusing job of documenting the varieties.

Of the earliest pioneers in the invention of practical photograpic arts, the Meade Brothers hold a prominent role with its introduction in the United States. In the early days of photography, the process was known as daguerreotyping…

William A. Drown Parasols and Umbrellas

During the 19th century Philadelphia was the umbrella and parasol capital of the United States. Unlike the inexpensive contraptions we take for granted today, during the 19th century the manufacture of these devices required skilled labor capable of crafting intricate components …

The Bailey & Co began its existence as the Bailey & Kitchen Jewelry Company in 1830. Founded by Joseph Trowbridge Bailey and Andrew B. Kitchen, the firm was located at 136 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Joseph Bailey was an accomplished silversmith and jeweler, and along with his partner Andrew Kitchen,Continue Reading

It wasn’t until the 1830s that carbonated beverages became popular by the American public. Until that time, manufacturing carbonated water was a very difficult and time consuming process. English Chemist Joseph Priestley in 1767 discovered a method for creating carbonated water by infusing plain water with carbon