Critical to the success in the early 20th century southern textile industry were the mill villages. Like coal and mining towns that supported their industries, mill villages supported textile and cotton mills, and were fully functional towns unto themselves…

In the year 1857 Simon Hernsheim, a native of New Orleans, established a tobacco company in the city.  Born in 1839, Hernsheim was but only 18 years old when he founded the business. The tobacco trade, a booming American industry, received much demand from overseas markets.

The Alleghany Furnace was established by Andrew Henderson and Robert Allison in 1811. For 8 years the partnership was in operation, until ceased in 1818. Facing stiff competition from more profitable and less costly furnace operations elsewhere, its owners could no longer afford

During the 1920s most of the strawberry growers located in and around Sarcoxie, Missouri participated in a farming cooperative. Like today’s orange growers, the purpose of the cooperative was to pool and leverage the resources of all the growers who were located in close geographic proximity.

On or about the year of 1879 the Champion Compress & Warehouse Company was incorporated in the city of Wilmington, North Carolina. An economic powerhouse, the company quickly attained a dominant role in the exportation of cotton crops grown and cultivated in the southern United States.

The coal mining towns of Dewar and Coalton, Oklahoma were located on the peripheries of what was once considered the greatest oil fields in the Western United States. The towns were located in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma, and were situated along the tracks of the Missouri, Oklahoma, and Gulf Railroad.

For many workers and families who worked mines and inhabited coal towns, English was a second or third language. As new immigrants recently settled in the United States, they were just learning to speak the language. Many others, who weren’t immigrants, were unable to read and write.